Soul Food at Stuff I Eat in Inglewood, California

Organic Soul Food Platter - Stuff I EatAfter last Thursday’s post about making my own soul bowls at home, I wanted to share with you one of my favorite restaurant soul food platters in recent memory.

When I was in Los Angeles a while back, I made it to a restaurant that I’ve been hearing about for eons – Stuff I Eat in Inglewood.  It’s a place that I have meant to visit again and again.  However, it seemed that usually when I was in the area, I was either on my way to the airport and in a hurry or coming back from the airport and in a hurry.  But as luck would have it this time around, I needed to pick up my rental car by LAX, which put me in the neighborhood at just the right time for lunch at Stuff I Eat.

Stuff I Eat - a vegan restaurant in Inglewood, CaliforniaStuff I Eat has been around since 2008.  Their food is 100% vegan and 95% organic.  It’s on the main drag of Market Street, along with other shops and restaurants.  The street was pretty quiet while I was there, as it was still early in the lunch hour.  Even though there’s a large awning outside with their name on it, because of the dark windows, I missed it and kept walking.  Even after I turned around and started walking back, I almost missed it again.  So etch this exterior into your mind’s eye and don’t make the same mistake I did.

Stuff I Eat - a vegan restaurant in Inglewood, CaliforniaStuff I Eat - a vegan restaurant in Inglewood, CaliforniaThe restaurant is clean and nicely laid out with café-style tables. The staff at the counter was all smiles and really helpful with ideas of their most popular items.  They’re well-known for their tacos, but obviously I had to go with another popular item on their menu, the Organic Soul Food Platter.

Organic Soul Food Platter - Stuff I EatI ordered a half order of the platter, which came to $12.  There was so much food, I easily could have shared it.  Instead, I took half home and finished it with breakfast the next day.

Organic Soul Food Platter - Stuff I EatThe platter came with generous helpings of yams, black-eyed peas, barbecued tofu, slow cooked kale, a cornbread muffin, potato salad, and mac and cheese.  The greens may well have been the best I’ve ever had.  They were melt-in-your-mouth good with that wonderful tinny-ness you get from cooking greens for a long time.

Organic Soul Food Platter - Stuff I EatThe black-eyed peas were also particularly well seasoned, and since they’re not always my favorite bean, I was surprised at how good they were.

Stuff I Eat is definitely one of those places where you can get caught in a circle of “just one more bite.”  With so many complimentary flavors and huge portions, this is the restaurant to visit with friends and/or a big appetite!  It is sure to be on my must-visit list on my next trip to Southern California.

How Ethiopian Food Became Weeknight-Friendly & My Love Affair with Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian

Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsIt is no secret that I love Ethiopian food.  (Although wouldn’t that be a weird thing to try to keep secret?  Psst…  Don’t tell this to anybody!  I love Ethiopian food!)  The spicy stews with layers of complex flavor, the spongy sour injera bread for scooping, the tactile pleasure of eating hand to mouth, the communal experience of sharing a platter with friends, and the combination of textures makes it my favorite cuisine.

However, in the past Ethiopian fare has been mostly limited to restaurant outings.  That was fine when I lived in a place where I could reach my favorite Ethiopian restaurant via a 40-minute car trip, but now the closest Ethiopian restaurant is 3 ½ to 4 hours away.  That moves a dinner of wots & basket of injera very much to the special occasion category.

Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsI’ve made Ethiopian meals at home many times, but it requires a lot of steps.  The first step requires making niter kibbeh (infused vegan butter or oil) that is the base for the stews (called wots).  Then, while a person can eat the wots on their own or with rice, it’s simply not the same experience without the injera for scooping.  I’ve never tried to go all out with one of the traditional recipes that require letting the batter sit for days until sour.  Instead I’ve used recipes calling for a yeast packet, and then waited for an hour for the batter to be ready (while hoping that the packet of yeast was good and I wouldn’t have to start all over again).  I’d stand over the stove, as if I was making pancakes, making each injera one by one.

Next, I’d have to make a couple of different spice blends, and then after that was all done, it was time to start cooking…  For a real meal, you need at least two stews, and all of that took time.  I’d typically have about one or two days a year when I felt like going to all of that work, and then I was pretty much spent.

Injera freezes well for an Ethiopian feast on a weeknightThen two things happened.  First, I realized that when I was traveling to places with Ethiopian restaurants, it wasn’t difficult to find grocery stores that also had injera for sale.  (I’m sure I could have bought it from those restaurants as well.)  I could take the injera back home with me, separate it into batches of three, and then freeze them.  If I wanted Ethiopian for dinner, I’d just have to pull a grouping of three out of the freezer and put it on the counter for a few hours, or in a pinch, I could take it straight from freezer to warm oven for thawing.

Three injera was enough for dinner that night for two and for one person to finish off leftovers the next day.  The injera wouldn’t be quite as moist as it was freshly made, but when you go the thawing-on-the-counter route, it thaws remarkably well.  And it’s certainly better than standing over the stove making hot injera when you’re hungry and ready to eat.

I’ve picked up injera in Chicago at Kukulu Market, in Minneapolis at Midtown Global Market, and yes, I even had two big packages of injera in my carry-on on my return trip from Los Angeles.  In L.A. I purchased it in one of the little markets in Little Ethiopia across the street from Rahel.

Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsThe second thing that happened was that I finally cracked open my copy of Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian by Kittee Berns that I bought long ago.

Kittee and I became blog buddies during some Vegan MoFo in years past, and then we met in real life at Vida Vegan Con last year.  One of the best and most unforeseen benefits of blogging has been creating friendships with readers and other bloggers.  Kittee is a good example of that.  In addition to loving her colorful and unique blog, Cake Maker to the Stars, that feels like such an extension of her own playful spirit, I’ve gotten to know Kittee over the years.

Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsSometime last fall I asked her where she found her big Ethiopian platters that decorate the walls in her kitchen, and on which she also serves Ethiopian food for large groups or uses for bake sales.  She said that they could be found in Ethiopian markets, and offered to keep an eye out for me since none of those exist in Iowa.

After many texts and pictures, she sent a platter my way along with berbere, one of the spice mixtures essential for Ethiopian cooking.  She told me that it was “the good stuff.”  I’d planned on paying Kittee back, but she surprised me by offering these as gifts.  (I can only imagine how hard it must have been to box up that huge platter!  It’s not exactly a size people just have laying around!)  It was such a wonderful surprise and so generous.

Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsPapa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsThen I pulled out my copy of (the now sold-out) Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine, and I started by making a big batch of niter kibbeh.  Using the recipe in the zine, this infused butter or oil can be made with vegan butter or canola oil.  In Kittee’s upcoming cookbook (more info on that to follow at the end of this post!), the niter kibbeh recipe will be made with a coconut oil blend, which sounds so good.  She advises making a big batch, so that way you always have it on hand for making wots.  This very cold winter, I’ve already worked my way through one batch of niter kibbeh and made a second batch last week!

Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsHaving easy access to this very flavorful base of Ethiopian cooking has been life-changing.  Now instead of Ethiopian being pushed to a rare treat, it’s seriously one of the simplest things to make during the week.  Most of the time it takes 30 minutes or less.  I just sauté onions and garlic in her niter kibbeh, add whatever other ingredients the recipe calls for, and plate it up with some thawed and heated injera.

It also makes for a tremendously inexpensive dinner, because the ingredients are really cost-effective things like red lentils, brown lentils, split peas, potatoes, carrots, collard greens, and the like.  Sometimes I’ll make one or two wots one night and then finish off the leftovers with a new wot the following night.

Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsAll of the Ethiopian platters in this post were made using various recipes from Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian.  Recipes I’ve made include azifa (brown lentil salad), ye’abesha gomen (mild collard greens), ingudai t’ibs (sautéed mushrooms), ye’takelt allecha (gingery mixed vegetables), ye’kik allecha (mild split pea puree), ye’miser allecha (mild red lentil puree), ye’kik w’et (split peas in a spicy gravy), and ye’miser w’et (red lentils in a spicy gravy).

Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian cook zine by Kittee BernsI’ve also started adding the niter kibbeh anywhere I can in my own recipes.  I love having Great Northern beans sautéed with garlic and onions in the infused oil since the flavor of the beans is very mild.  It just lets all of the spices shine through.

Polenta made with Ethiopian infused butter, niter kibbehMy most recent favorite way to use it is by making my easy breakfast polenta, but then sautéing the garlic in niter kibbeh instead of extra virgin olive oil before following the rest of the recipe as is.  Sometimes I’ll have that for breakfast, or I’ll make it a hearty lunch by adding greens and chickpeas.  (The chickpeas are dark here, because I added Indian gooseberries to this batch when I was making them from scratch.)

Seriously, every recipe I’ve tried in Papa Tofu Loves Ethiopian has been fantastic.   I don’t know how Kittee is going to improve on them for her Ethiopian cookbook that’s coming out late this year or around New Year 2015, but somehow that’s happening along with a lot more recipes than were in her zine.  (All of the recipes will be gluten-free and vegan just like she is.)

In the meantime, the zine is not available for purchase any longer, but I highly recommend picking up a copy of the cookbook when it comes out.  I know I’ll be preordering when the opportunity presents itself!  I’ll keep you posted when the time comes!